Iberian Delight

14 nights - 16 May 2024
Western Europe
W9U1HO

CRUISE ONLY WAS £11639 pp £7253 PP
Prices based on 2 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY WAS £12119 pp £7559 PP
Prices based on 2 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY WAS £13124 pp £8072 PP
Prices based on 2 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY WAS £16424 pp £8926 PP
Prices based on 2 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

Want to add a hotel stay or change your flights?

Just call our team of cruise specialists to help build your dream cruise holiday today!

CRUISE ONLY Call
Prices based on 3 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY Call
Prices based on 3 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY Call
Prices based on 3 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY £25607
Prices based on 3 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

Want to add a hotel stay or change your flights?

Just call our team of cruise specialists to help build your dream cruise holiday today!

CRUISE ONLY Call
Prices based on 4 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY Call
Prices based on 4 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY Call
Prices based on 4 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

CRUISE ONLY £30696
Prices based on 4 people sharing. Cruise only price does not include flights. Fly-cruise price may vary by chosen UK airport.

Image featured for illustrative purposes only

Want to add a hotel stay or change your flights?

Just call our team of cruise specialists to help build your dream cruise holiday today!

(Prices correct as of today’s date, are updated daily, are subject to change and represent genuine availability at time of update).

This cruise only holiday is financially protected by ABTA

Please click here to check the essential travel requirements before booking this cruise.

Our sister brand SixStarCruises specialise in luxury and ultra luxury cruise holidays. Click here to view this itinerary in full and speak to one of our specialist cruise concierge today. Our team are here to help you plan your perfect cruise holiday and guide you with first hand experience with more time on board than any other UK luxury travel agent.

Itinerary


Take a look at the shore excursions available for this itinerary.

1

Monaco

The 202-hectare Principality of Monaco is located east of France’s Mediterranean coast. Known for its royal family, especially Prince Albert of Monaco, its casinos and racetracks and for being a wealthy state with no applied taxes. Monaco is reachable by air through the French airport of Nice Côte d'Azur, located approximately 16 miles from the principality.

16 May 2024
Monaco
2

Marseille

Since being designated a European Capital of Culture for 2013, with an estimated €660 million of funding in the bargain, Marseille has been in the throes of an extraordinary transformation, with no fewer than five major new arts centers, a beautifully refurbished port, revitalized neighborhoods, and a slew of new shops and restaurants. Once the underdog, this time-burnished city is now welcoming an influx of weekend tourists who have colonized entire neighborhoods and transformed them into elegant pieds-à-terre (or should we say, mer). The second-largest city in France, Marseille is one of Europe's most vibrant destinations. Feisty and fond of broad gestures, it is also as complicated and as cosmopolitan now as it was when a band of Phoenician Greeks first sailed into the harbor that is today's Vieux Port in 600 BC. Legend has it that on that same day a local chieftain's daughter, Gyptis, needed to choose a husband, and her wandering eyes settled on the Greeks' handsome commander Protis. Her dowry brought land near the mouth of the Rhône, where the Greeks founded Massalia, the most important Continental shipping port in antiquity. The port flourished for some 500 years as a typical Greek city, enjoying the full flush of classical culture, its gods, its democratic political system, its sports and theater, and its naval prowess. Caesar changed all that, besieging the city in 49 BC and seizing most of its colonies. In 1214 Marseille was seized again, this time by Charles d'Anjou, and was later annexed to France by Henri IV in 1481, but it was not until Louis XIV took the throne that the biggest transformations of the port began; he pulled down the city walls in 1666 and expanded the port to the Rive Neuve (New Riverbank). The city was devastated by plague in 1720, losing more than half its population. By the time of the Revolution, Marseille was on the rebound once again, with industries of soap manufacturing and oil processing flourishing, encouraging a wave of immigration from Provence and Italy. With the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, Marseille became the greatest boomtown in 19th-century Europe. With a large influx of immigrants from areas as exotic as Tangiers, the city quickly acquired the multicultural population it maintains to this day.

17 May 2024
... Read More
Marseille
3

At Sea

18 May 2024
4

Málaga

As you sail into Malaga you will notice what an idyllic setting the city enjoys on the famous Costa del Sol. To the east of this provincial capital, the coast along the region of La Axarqua is scattered with villages, farmland and sleepy fishing hamlets - the epitome of traditional rural Spain. To the west stretches a continuous city where the razzmatazz and bustle creates a colourful contrast that is easily recognisable as the Costa del Sol. Surrounding the region, the Penibéetica Mountains provide an attractive backdrop overlooking the lower terraced slopes which yield olives and almonds. This spectacular mountain chain shelters the province from cold northerly winds, giving it a reputation as a therapeutic and exotic place in which to escape from cold northern climes. Malaga is also the gateway to many of Andalusia's enchanting historic villages, towns and cities.

19 May 2024
... Read More
Málaga
5

Tangier

Tangier can trace its origins back to the Phoenicians and ancient Greeks. It was named after Tinge, the mother of Hercules’ son, and its beginnings are embedded in mythology. It was subsequently a Roman province, and after Vandal and Byzantine influences, was occupied by the Arabs with Spain, Portugal, France and England also playing a part in the city’s history. With such a diverse past it is perhaps not surprising that Tangier is such an individual city. Overlooking the Straits of Gibraltar, the city lies on a bay between two promontories. With its old Kasbah, panoramic views, elegant buildings, squares and places of interest, there is much to discover in both the new and old parts of the city.

20 May 2024
... Read More
Tangier
6

Cádiz

Believed to be the oldest town on the Iberian Peninsula, the Andalusian port of Cádiz enjoys a stunning location at the edge of a six-mile promontory. The town itself, with 3,000 years of history, is characterised by pretty white houses with balconies often adorned with colourful flowers. As you wander around be sure to take a stroll through the sizeable Plaza de Espãna, with its large monument dedicated to the first Spanish constitution, which was signed here in 1812. Cádiz has two pleasant seafront promenades which boast fine views of the Atlantic Ocean, and has a lovely park, the Parque Genoves, located close to the sea with an open-air theatre and attractive palm garden. Also notable is the neo-Classical cathedral, capped by a golden dome.

21 May 2024
... Read More
Cádiz
7

Lisbon

Set on seven hills on the banks of the River Tagus, Lisbon has been the capital of Portugal since the 13th century. It is a city famous for its majestic architecture, old wooden trams, Moorish features and more than twenty centuries of history. Following disastrous earthquakes in the 18th century, Lisbon was rebuilt by the Marques de Pombal who created an elegant city with wide boulevards and a great riverfront and square, Praça do Comércio. Today there are distinct modern and ancient sections, combining great shopping with culture and sightseeing in the Old Town, built on the city's terraced hillsides. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

22 May 2024
... Read More
Lisbon
8

Porto

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city's most famous product - port wine. Oporto's strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town's importance since ancient times. The Romans built a fort here where their trading route crossed the Douro, and the Moors brought their own culture to the area. Oporto profited from provisioning crusaders en route to the Holy Land and enjoyed the riches from Portuguese maritime discoveries during the 15th and 16th centuries. Later, port wine trade with Britain compensated for the loss of the spice trade and the end of gold and gem shipments from Brazil. In the 19th century, the city went through a period of new prosperity with the rise of industries. In its wake followed the building of workers' quarters and opulent residences. Since the declaration of Oporto as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, the city aims to build up a cultural reference that will provide it with a new image, based on deep historical roots. Among the attractions that make Oporto such an interesting place are its graceful bridges spanning the Douro River, a picturesque riverfront quarter and, most notable, its world-famous port wine lodges. Although Oporto is a bustling centre and home to many different businesses, the source of its greatest fame is the rich, sweet fortified red wine we know as port.

23 May 2024
... Read More
Porto
9

Ferrol

El Ferrol has been inextricably linked to the sea for more than two millennia, being a major shipbuilding centre for most of its history. From its beginnings as a tiny fishing port in the 1st century BC, it endured conquests by Vandals, Suebis, Arabs and Christians. With the arrival of the Bourbons in the 18th century, Ferrol became a leading maritime centre, largely due to its large natural harbour on the Ferrol Inlet, an arm of the Atlantic. Now a large commercial port, Ferrol is also the gateway to the northern Spanish province of Galicia, a region noted for its green mountains, deep gorges and fast-flowing rivers. It is also well placed for visiting the medieval holy city of Santiago de Compostela. Interestingly, Ferrol's city centre is modelled on Lisbon in Portugal, a country with which it has strong historical and linguistic ties. The layout comprises of a rectangle lined with six parallel streets, with two squares on each side. These squares have the city's best shops, restaurants and bars.

24 May 2024
... Read More
Ferrol
10

Bilbao

Time in Bilbao (Bilbo, in Euskera) may be recorded as BG or AG (Before Guggenheim or After Guggenheim). Never has a single monument of art and architecture so radically changed a city. Frank Gehry's stunning museum, Norman Foster's sleek subway system, the Santiago Calatrava glass footbridge and airport, the leafy César Pelli Abandoibarra park and commercial complex next to the Guggenheim, and the Philippe Starck AlhóndigaBilbao cultural center have contributed to an unprecedented cultural revolution in what was once the industry capital of the Basque Country.Greater Bilbao contains almost 1 million inhabitants, nearly half the total population of the Basque Country. Founded in 1300 by Vizcayan noble Diego López de Haro, Bilbao became an industrial center in the mid-19th century, largely because of the abundance of minerals in the surrounding hills. An affluent industrial class grew up here, as did the working class in suburbs that line the Margen Izquierda (Left Bank) of the Nervión estuary.Bilbao's new attractions get more press, but the city's old treasures still quietly line the banks of the rust-color Nervión River. The Casco Viejo (Old Quarter)—also known as Siete Calles (Seven Streets)—is a charming jumble of shops, bars, and restaurants on the river's Right Bank, near the Puente del Arenal bridge. This elegant proto-Bilbao nucleus was carefully restored after devastating floods in 1983. Throughout the Casco Viejo are ancient mansions emblazoned with family coats of arms, wooden doors, and fine ironwork balconies. The most interesting square is the 64-arch Plaza Nueva, where an outdoor market is pitched every Sunday morning.Walking the banks of the Nervión is a satisfying jaunt. After all, this was how—while out on a morning jog—Guggenheim director Thomas Krens first discovered the perfect spot for his project, nearly opposite the right bank's Deusto University. From the Palacio de Euskalduna upstream to the colossal Mercado de la Ribera, parks and green zones line the river. César Pelli's Abandoibarra project fills in the half mile between the Guggenheim and the Euskalduna bridge with a series of parks, the Deusto University library, the Meliá Bilbao Hotel, and a major shopping center.On the left bank, the wide, late-19th-century boulevards of the Ensanche neighborhood, such as Gran Vía (the main shopping artery) and Alameda de Mazarredo, are the city's more formal face. Bilbao's cultural institutions include, along with the Guggenheim, a major museum of fine arts (the Museo de Bellas Artes) and an opera society (Asociación Bilbaína de Amigos de la Ópera, or ABAO) with 7,000 members from Spain and southern France. In addition, epicureans have long ranked Bilbao's culinary offerings among the best in Spain. Don't miss a chance to ride the trolley line, the Euskotram, for a trip along the river from Atxuri Station to Basurto's San Mamés soccer stadium, reverently dubbed "la Catedral del Fútbol" (the Cathedral of Football).

25 May 2024
... Read More
Bilbao
11

Bordeaux

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

26 May 2024
... Read More
Bordeaux
12

Bordeaux

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

27 May 2024
... Read More
Bordeaux
13

Saint-Jean-de-Luz

28 May 2024
14

At Sea

29 May 2024
15

Southampton

Lying near the head of Southampton Water, a peninsula between the estuaries of the Rivers Test and Itchen, Southampton is Britain’s largest cruise port. It has been one of England’s major ports since the Middle Ages, when it exported wool and hides from the hinterland and imported wine from Bordeaux. The city suffered heavy damage during World War Two and as a result the centre has been extensively rebuilt, but there are still some interesting medieval buildings including the Bargate, one of the finest city gatehouses in England.

30 May 2024
... Read More
Southampton

*This holiday is generally suitable for persons with reduced mobility. For customers with reduced mobility or any medical condition that may require special assistance or arrangements to be made, please notify your Cruise Concierge at the time of your enquiry, so that we can provide specific information as to the suitability of the holiday, as well as make suitable arrangements with the Holiday Provider on your behalf.

Map


What's Included with Regent Seven Seas Cruises


Regent is a premium cruise line, offering luxurious facilities within an all-inclusive package. Enjoy amenities such as all-suite accommodations, round-trip business class air, unlimited shore excursions, unlimited internet access, world-class cuisine as well as fine wines and spirits.

The cruise line boasts a five-ship fleet which sails to over 450 destinations throughout the world, exploring stunning ports and delightful destinations as you enjoy the comfort and decadence of Regent's on-board facilities.

Entertainment throughout the day and evening
WiFi included on-board
24-hour room service
Shuttle service to and from ports and airport where available
In-suite mini bar replenished daily
1:1.5 staff to guest ratio
Pre- or post-cruise hotel stays and land programmes on selected sailings
Return flights included from a choice of UK airports (fly cruise bookings only)
Gratuities included on-board
Self-service laundry
Unlimited beverages
Butler service for selected suites
Unlimited shore excursions
Luxurious, all-suite accommodation

Explore Seven Seas Splendor

There's so much to do on the Seven Seas Splendor. On-board facilities include entertainment venues such as the Constellation Theater and Observation Lounge, as well as the Culinary Arts Kitchen which offers cookery classes to on-board passengers. 

Indulge in fine dining experiences with an array of eating options, including Compass Rose, Coffee Connection, Pacific Rim, Chartreuse, Prime 7 and La Veranda. Out on deck, you will find an infinity pool and putting green - while the ultimate relaxation options can be found in the on-board spa.

The Seven Seas Splendor ship embraces intricate marble patterns and sparkling chandeliers which will guide you deck-by-deck through the cruise's interior, adorned with inspiring spaces which provide sophistication and ambience - a signature Regent Seven Seas Cruises experience.

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Seven Seas Splendor Cabins & Suites


On-board accommodation will comprise a range of suites - from a Veranda Suite to Regent Suite. Many include free unlimited Wi-Fi, luxurious bathroom amenities, plush bathrobes and slippers and a personalised in-suite mini-bar. Discover your Seven Seas Splendor cruise cabin or suite below. 

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